1969-70

  • Portfolio: Parts Of A Machine, ink on paper, 12.875” x 9.875”

    José Ramón Alejandro (b. 1943, Havana): After living in Buenos Aires and Montevideo in the early 1960s, Alejandro moved to Paris in 1963 and spent the next 30 years in France, working as an artist, book illustrator and designer. He had his first exhibition at the Galerie Lambert and went on to participate in shows throughout Europe, Israel and the United States. His work was included in the Outside Cuba exhibition, and is in the permanent collection of the Miami-Dade Public Library. Alejandro moved to Miami in 1995. Over the years, Alejandro’s early geometric paintings have evolved into lush tropical landscapes; noted Cuban writer Antonio José Ponte called him “an artist of the terrible, of mystery.'' (Cintas for art, 1969-70, 1971-72)

  • JOSE+YGNACIO+BERMUDEZ

    Casseopia, 1970, Stainless steel (four piece geometric form in box), 31.5” x 24”

    José Ygnacio Bermúdez (b. 1922, Havana 1922 – d, 1998, Phoenix): Part of a group of abstract expressionist artists who came of age in the 1950s and became known as “Los Once,” Bermúdez was known for his work in painting, sculpture, photography and graphic design. Between 1953 and 1971, he was program officer in the Cultural Affairs Division of the Organization of American States and later head of its graphic services division. He exhibited widely in the United States and abroad, including solo shows at the Museo de Bellas Artes in Caracas. In 1961, he won first prize at the American Mural Competition in Maryland, and in 1969, second prize at the IX Festival de Arte in Cali, Colombia. Bermúdez also made several documentary films. His work is in several major collections and museums, including the Detroit Art Institute, the J.B. Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Ky., the Museo de Bellas Artes de Caracas, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Miami-Dade Public Library and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. (Cintas for art, 1969-70, 1970-71)

  • Guillermo Carrión (Cintas for literature, 1968-69, 1969-70)

  • Construction,1969, Wood-plexi, H: 35.5 x W: 22.5 x D: 8

    Waldo Díaz-Balart (b. 1931, Holguin): A longtime resident of Madrid, Díaz-Balart studied accounting and political science and economics in Havana before moving to New York to pursue art studies in 1962. Díaz-Balart’s work – explorations of color and light in geometric paintings and light sculpture – has been widely exhibited. He has had one-man shows in the Netherlands, in Spain and in the United States at the Art Gallery of Florida International University. He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation fellowship and his work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid, the Mondriaanhuis in Amersfoort, The Netherlands, and the Museum of Modern Art in Huenfeld, Germany, among others. In 1992 he published the book Waldo Díaz-Balart, Ensayos de Arte. (Cintas for art, 1968-69, 1969-70)

  •  José Antonio Gómez (b. 1945, Jaruco): The sculptor José Antonio Gómez has had solo exhibitions at the Thorne Building in Millbrook and at the Hudson Hall Gallery of Dutchess Community College, both in New York, and has participated in numerous group shows in that state. Gómez is the recipient of grants from the Storm King Sculpture Center, Dutchess County and the National Community Arts Program. He won five merit awards and three “best in sculpture” awards from the Barrett Art Center in Poughkeepsie. In addition to his art career, Gómez has been involved in computer systems development and in teaching mathematics. His work is in the permanent collections of the Barrett Art Center, the Dutchess County Community College and the St. Peter's College Art Department in Union City, New Jersey, among others. (Cintas for art, 1968-69, 1969-70)

  • Man In Anguish, 1969, oil on masonite, 37” x 47”

    Angel R. Pedreguera (b. 1938, Havana-d. 1979, Miami): Under the sponsorship of the City of Miami, Pedreguera created a mural dedicated to Our Lady of Charity in Little Havana’s Southwest Eighth Street and 15th Avenue. (Cintas for art, 1969-70)

  • Cloud Pictogram XVII, 1983, oil on canvas, 41" X 71"

    Baruj Salinas (b. 1935, Havana): An architect by training – he studied at Kent State University in Ohio – Salinas found early success as a painter and engraver. He is also an educator, having taught for many years at Miami Dade College. Salinas is regularly featured in solo shows in galleries in Europe and the United States. His participation in group exhibitions includes Recent Developments in Latin American Drawing at The Art Institute of Chicago, Outside Cuba, and Breaking Barriers: Selections from the Museum of Art’s Permanent Contemporary Cuban Collection at the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale. He is the winner of numerous awards, including the Prize to Excellency at the VII Grand Prix International de Peinture  in Cannes, France; a first prize at the IV Pan American Exhibition in Miami, and a first prize at the Sexta Bienal de San Juan del Grabado Latinoamericano in San Juan, Puerto Rico. His work is in the collections of museums in Israel, Spain, Colombia, Mexico and the United States. (Cintas for art, 1969-70, 1970-71)

  • Ana Simo (b. 1943, Cienfuegos): Simo is the author of several plays, including Alma, Penguins and Going to New England, of films and radio plays, and of the short story collection Las fábulas. She wrote the essay, Lydia Cabrera: An Intimate Portrait, for the exhibition at Intar Latin American Gallery in 1984. She was a cofounder of the direct action group The Lesbian Avengers and of Dyke TV, a half-hour television program that aired on public-access television across the United States for more than a decade.(Cintas for literature, 1969-70, 1970-71)

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