1971-72

  • Portfolio: Parts Of A Machine, ink on paper, 12.875” x 9.875”

    José Ramón Alejandro (b. 1943, Havana): After living in Buenos Aires and Montevideo in the early 1960s, Alejandro moved to Paris in 1963 and spent the next 30 years in France, working as an artist, book illustrator and designer. He had his first exhibition at the Galerie Lambert and went on to participate in shows throughout Europe, Israel and the United States. His work was included in the Outside Cuba exhibition, and is in the permanent collection of the Miami-Dade Public Library. Alejandro moved to Miami in 1995. Over the years, Alejandro’s early geometric paintings have evolved into lush tropical landscapes; noted Cuban writer Antonio José Ponte called him “an artist of the terrible, of mystery.'' (Cintas for art, 1969-70, 1971-72)

  • Galaor Carbonell (b. Havana, 1938-d. Miami, 1992): A painter as well as a sculptor and critic, Carbonell was also a professor at universities in Kentucky and Colombia. He exhibited regularly in Kentucky in the 1960s and in Colombia in the 1970s and ‘80s, and wrote frequently about art. He won the Wendell Smock Sculpture Prize from the Louisville Arts Center in 1961. Carbonell received a Master’s degree from the University of Kentucky. (Cintas for art, 1971-72)

  • Mercedes Cortázar (b. 1940, Havana): A poet, playwright, novelist and journalist, Cortázar’s work has been published in literary magazines and newspapers – both printed and on the Web – in Spain, France, the United States and various countries in Latin America. In Cuba, Cortázar was a member of the group of young Havana poets and writers known as El Puente, which published her first book of poetry, El largo canto. In New York in 1962, she was a founder of Protesta, possibly the first literary magazine by Cuban exiles.  Later, she was the poetry consultant for Farrar, Straus & Giroux for the English translation of José Lezama Lima’s novel Paradiso. (Cintas for literature, 1971-72)

  • Te Sentiras Aqui Como En Tu Casa,1971, Oil on canvas, 32” x 40”

    Fernando Luis Dominguez (b. 1932, Havana-d.1983, Miami): The large surrealist paintings that Dominguez produced toward the end of his career were only one aspect of his art, which also included drawings, engravings and ceramics. His work, first shown at the Lyceum in Havana in 1962, has been exhibited internationally and was included in the Outside Cuba exhibition. He received an honorable mention at the IV Paris Biennial and an award for drawing at the VIII International Competition of the Fundación Joan Miró in Barcelona. His pieces are in the permanent collections of the museums of modern art of Madrid, San Sebastian and Santiago de Chile, and in the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana. He lived in Spain and France between 1970 and 1976, when he moved to Miami. He was known professionally as Fernando Luis. (Cintas for art, 1971-72)

  • Antonio Fidalgo: (Cintas for art, 1971-72)

  • Untitled,1971, Oil on canvas, 36.5” X 38.5”

    Osvaldo Gutiérrez (b. 1917, Matanzas-d. 1997, Miami): Although he worked for many years as a set designer for the theater, Gutiérrez always pursued a career as a painter and had exhibitions throughout Latin America, Europe and the United States. He participated in Art Cubain Contemporain at the Musée National d’Art Moderne in Paris in 1951, the Homenaje a la pintura latinoamericanain El Salvador in 1977 and in Hispanic-American Artists of the United States: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Cuba and Uruguay, at the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America, in Washington D.C., in 1979. His work is in the collections of the Lowe Art Museum of the University of Miami, the Miami-Dade Public Library, the Museo Nacional, Montevideo, and the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America, among others (Cintas for art, 1970-71, 1971-72)

  • Robert F. Lima Jr. (b.1935, Havana): A literary critic, biographer, editor, poet and translator, Lima is professor emeritus of Spanish and Comparative Literature at Pennsylvania State University. He is a fellow emeritus of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities and a corresponding member of Spain’s Real Academia de la Lengua. Among his 20 books are The Theatre of García Lorca, Valle Inclán: The Theatre of His Llife (which was translated into Spanish) and Dark Prisms: Occultism in Hispanic Drama.  More than 300 of his poems have been published in journals in the United States and abroad; they have also been collected in six books, including Poems of Exile and Alienation, Fathoms, Mayaland and Tracking the Minotaur. Lima has a Ph.D. in romance languages and literature from New York University. He was a senior Fulbright-Hays fellow in Peru, where he was poet-in-residence at the Universidad de San Marcos. (Cintas for literature, 1971-72)

  • Inverna Lockpez (b. 1941, Havana) A widely-exhibited artist, Lockpez has also been a visual arts consultant for private foundations and corporations such as AT&T New Art/New Visions International Program and the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest International Artist Series. From 1979 to 1994, she was director of the INTAR Gallery in New York, where she curated more than 250 exhibitions. In 2001, she became the curator of the Erpf Gallery at the Catskill Center. Lockpez attended medical school at the University of Havana, and studied art at the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes San Alejandro and the Taller de Grabado in Havana. She also studied social work at Columbia University and film/video and computer graphics at the School of Visual Arts in New York. She has lectured at Columbia and Cornell universities, Hunter College and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, among many institutions. She is past president of the National Association of Artists' Organizations. Lockpez is the winner of grants and fellowships from the Roxbury Arts Group, Creative Artists Public Service (CAPS, for sculpture), CETA, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Vogelstein Foundation. In 2010, her graphic novel, My Revolution, was published by DC Comics/Vertigo. (Cintas for arts, 1970-71, 1971-72)

  • Tomás Luis López-Gottardi An architect and educator, López-Gottardi leads his own architecture firm in Coral Gables and has designed buildings and complexes such as the Venetian Harbor Condominiums in Miami and the Moscow River Center in Russia, as well as several residences in Miami-Dade County. He has directed several design competitions and is active in design research related to the South Florida community. López-Gottardi is a professor at the University of Miami, where he directs the undergraduate architecture program. He received his architecture degree from the University of Havana and has a Master’s degree in architecture from Harvard University and a second one in urban design and city planning from the University of Pennsylvania. (Cintas for architecture, 1971-72)

  • Under The Moon and The Sun, 1971, oil on canvas, 51" x 62"

    José M. Mijares (b. 1921, Havana-d. 2004, Coral Gables) A painter, engraver and muralist, Mijares was a member of the Grupo Diez Pintores Concretos formed in Havana in 1958. The artists were influenced by the tradition of European concrete painters and were pioneers in geometric abstraction in Latin America. Mijares studied at the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes San Alejandro and then taught there until moving to the United States in 1960. His drawings were used as illustrations in the magazine Orígenes. He participated in numerous exhibitions, beginning in 1944, when he had his first solo show at the Conservatorio Nacional Hubert de Blanck in Havana. In 1950, he won first prize at the Salón Nacional de Pintura, Escultura y Grabado in Havana. He was represented in the exhibition Modern Cuban Painters at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Outside Cuba exhibition and in HispanicAmerican Artists of the United States at the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America in Washington, D.C. In 1994, the Museo Cubano de Arte y Cultura in Miami celebrated his 50th anniversary as an artist with an exhibition. His work is in the collection of the Lowe Art Museum, the MiamiDade Public Library System, the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Florida International University awarded Mijares an honorary degree in 2001.  (Cintas for art, 1970-71, 1971-72)

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