1972-73

  • Juan Alonso (Cintas for literature, 1972-73)

  • José Bernardo (b. 1938, Havana): The winner of three Cintas fellowships, Bernardo is the composer of La Niña, a musical tragedy based on José Martí's poem La Niña de Guatemala that received an award from the National Opera Institute (now National Institute of Musical Theatre). He also composed Concerto Barroco, Taliesin Symphony, Concerto for Viola and Orchestra and Concerto for Piano, Cuban Dance Band and Symphony Orchestra. As a designer, he worked with the architecture firm Harrison and Abramovitz in New York. Independently, he participated in projects at various museums, including the Metropolitan Museum, the Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Natural History. Bernardo is also an author whose books include Silent Wing, The Secret of the Bulls and The Wise Women of Havana.  He has a Ph.D. from Columbia University. (Cintas for music, 1970-71, 1972-73, and for architecture, 1969-70)

  • Self-Portrait Of Ree Coos, 1973, Ink on paper print, edition 41/58, 28.5” x 21.625”

    Rafael Consuegra (b. 1941, Havana): A sculptor who works in clay as well as metal, Consuegra has taught at Miami-Dade College, Barry University and at his own studio. In 1995, Galería Vanidades in Miami presented a retrospective of his work at. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Miami. His pieces are in the permanent collections of Barry University and the Museum of Latin American Art in Los Angeles, among others. (Cintas for art, 1972-73, 1973-74)

  • Luis Cruz Azaceta (b. 1942, Havana): After arriving in the United States in 1960, Luis Cruz Azaceta settled in New York, where he studied at the School of Visual Arts and participated in the city’s neo-expressionism movement of the 1970s. He now lives in New Orleans. He is widely exhibited in the United States and abroad. Cruz’s work was selected for the Canadian Club’s Mira! Hispanic Art Tour in 1985, for the Outside Cuba exhibition and for Cuba-USA: The First Generation, which toured this country in the early 1990s. He is the winner of grants and fellowships from the Penny McCall Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, among others. His pieces are in several permanent collections, including those of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art, the Rhode Island School of Design, the Houston Museum of Fine Arts and the Miami-Dade Public Library. (Cintas for art, 1972-73, 1975-76) 

  • Jorge L. Estévanez (b. Havana): The vice-president and co-founder of Urban Architects, Estévanez has been involved throughout his career in a variety of housing, commercial and institutional projects. He has a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the University of Florida and a master’s from the Pratt Institute in New York. (Cintas for architecture, 1972-73)

  • JUAN GONZALEZ

    Farewell Gift, 1972, hand-colored lithograph on paper, 29.75” x 24.25”

    Juan J. González (b. 1942, Camagüey- d. 1993, New York): The super-realist artist Juan González participated in group shows such as Painting and Sculpture Today1974 at the Indianapolis Museum of Art; Looking Inside: Latin American Presence in New York; Ancient Roots/ New Visions, which traveled to several cities in the United States; HispanicAmerican Artists of the United States, at the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America in Washington, D.C., The Figure in the Twentieth Century at the New York Academy of Design, Outside Cuba, The Miami Generation traveling exhibition and the Cuba-USA: The First Generation traveling exhibition. He had solo shows in the United States and abroad in venues such as the Center for InterAmerican Relations and the Nancy Hoffman Gallery in New York, the Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art, the Meadows Museum in Dallas and the Center for the Fine Arts in Miami. He was the recipient of a Creative Artists Public Service (CAPS) Fellowship and of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. His work is in the permanent collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, The Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Miami-Dade Public Library and the Smithsonian Institution, among others. González was one of the artists featured in Wayne Salazar’s 1985 documentary Cuba-USA: Three Cuban Artists in New York City. From 1984 to the time of his death, González was a member of the board of governors of the New York Foundation for the Arts.  He received a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Miami. (Cintas for art, 1972-73, 1974-75)

  • Untitled,Oil on canvas, 54 x 29 inches

    Sylvia Kozer Baggetta (b. 1944, Havana): (Cintas for art, 1972-73, 1980-81)

  • Mario Pena (Cintas for literature, 1972-73)

  •  Jose Angel Piedra: Painter. (Cintas in art, 1972-73)

  • José Mario Rodríguez (b. 1940, Güira de Melena - d. 2002, Madrid): Known professionally as José Mario, Rodríguez authored a volume of children’s plays and more than a dozen poetry collections, among them Clamor agudo, La torcida raíz de tanto daño and Muerte del amor por la soledad. An anthology of his poetry, El grito y otros poemas, was published by Betania in 2000. He was one of the founders Ediciones El Puente, which published the work of young writers in Cuba during the 1960s, but was eventually shut down by the Cuban government. Rodríguez revived El Puente in 1968 after he moved to Madrid, where he also founded Ediciones La Gota de Agua. Reporting on his death, Madrid’s El País newspaper called him “one of the indispensable figures of Cuban poetry during the second half of the 20th century” (Cintas for literature, 1972-73, 1973-74)

  •  Orfillio Urquiola: Sculptor. (Cintas for art, 1972-73)

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