1979-80

  • Iván Acosta (b. 1944, Santiago de Cuba): A New York-based playwright, filmmaker and concert producer, Acosta wrote the play that became the basis for the classic Cuban-exile film El super, released in 1979. His 1985 film, Amigos, is a comedy about a Mariel refugee trying to make a home in Miami. In 2001, he released the documentary How to Create a Rumba, which uses interviews with Cuban musicians along with videos of their performances to trace the influence of the rumba in Cuban music. It was featured in the Latin Beat film festival at Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater. (Cintas for literature, 1979-80)

  • The Great Butcher I and The Great Butcher II, Oil on canvas, dyptich format, 48” x 30”

    Alejandro Anreus (b. 1960, Havana): Though he began his career as an artist, Anreus is now an art historian and poet, and is professor of art history at William Paterson University. For many years, he worked as curator at the Montclair Art Museum and the Jersey City Museum. He regularly participates in panels and seminars on Latin American art. Among the exhibitions he has organized are Ben Shahn and The Passion of Sacco and Vanzetti at the Jersey City Museum and Juan Sánchez: Printed Convictions, Subversions/Affirmations: Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, and A Survey and Latino Visions II at the Aljira Center for Contemporary Art in Newark, NJ. He has been published widely in art magazines such as Art Nexus, Canícula and Encuentro, and has written many exhibition catalogues. He was editor and essayist for Orozco in Gringoland: The Years in New York,and he is the editor of Mexican Muralism A Critical History with Robin Adele Greeley and Leonard Folgarait. Anreus received a Ph.D. in art history from the Graduate Center at CUNY.  When he won his first Cintas fellowship, he became the youngest person ever to receive the award. (Cintas in art, 1979-80, 1986-87)

  • In Honor of Wasily Kandinsky,1969, Oil on canvas, 20” x 24”

    Lilliam Becker (b. Havana): A freelance art director, translator and teacher, Becker has worked with fashion photographers and record and video producers. Her drawings, etchings and silk-screens have been exhibited in galleries in Puerto Rico, Japan, Italy, Venezuela and several cities in the United States. Becker graduated from the City University of New York and studied film and languages in Florence, Italy. (Cintas in art, 1979)

  • Atlantida Habanera, 2007, Acrylic on canvas, 48” x 48” 

    Humberto Calzada (b. 1944, Havana): The paintings and prints of Miami-based artist Humberto Calzada are rich with architectural imagery and highly evocative of Cuba. They have been exhibited in solo and group shows in the United States and Latin America, including a 1991 retrospective at the Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach. Calzada is the winner of the 1978 acquisition prize from the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America in Washington, D.C., and the recipient of a painting fellowship from the Florida Fine Arts Council. He was selected for the third ¡Mira! Canadian Club Hispanic Art Tour, the Outside Cuba exhibition, the Miami Generation traveling exhibition and the Cuba-USA: The First Generation traveling exhibition. His work is in numerous private and public collections, including Miami-Dade’s Art in Public Places collection, the permanent collection of the Miami-Dade Public Library, the Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach, the Denver Art Museum, the Museo de Arte de Ponce in Puerto Rico, the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Chile and the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America in Washington, D.C. Calzada studied industrial engineering and has a Master in Business Administration from the University of Miami. He taught engineering at Miami-Dade Community College in the early 1970s, but has since dedicated himself fully to his painting. (Cintas, 1979-80, 1981-82)

  • The Fool With A Balloon,1973, Oil on canvas, 36.5” x 30.75”

    Ramón Carulla (b. Havana, 1938): A painter and engraver, Carulla’s work was included in the Latin America Graphic Arts Biennial at the Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art in New York, the Grands et Jeunes d’Aujourd’hui exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, the Norwegian International Print Biennale and the Sapporo International Biennial in Japan, among others. Carulla participated in Expresiones Hispanas, a national tour of U.S. Hispanic artists in 1988-89. He won the Simon Daro Daridowicz Painting Award in 1980 from the Metropolitan Museum and Art Center in Coral Gables, as well as prizes from the VI Biennial in San Juan and the 8th Mini Print Internacional de Cadaqués in Barcelona. His work is represented in several collections, including those of the Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach, the Centre International d’Art Contemporain in Paris, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Detroit Institute of Art, the Joan Miró Foundation in Barcelona, the Japan Printmakers Association, the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Rufino Tamayo in Mexico City, the Museum of Fine Arts in Montreal and the Miami-Dade Public Library. (Cintas for art, 1973-74, 1979-80)

  • Untitled,1983, Acrylic and ink on canvas, 30” x 40”

    Humberto Figueras (b. 1948, Camagüey): Figueras’ work is in the permanent collection of the Miami Public Library. (Cintas for art, 1979-80).

  • Lourdes Gil (b. 1950, Havana): A writer, teacher, editor and journalist, Gil is the author of the poetry collections El cerco de las transfiguraciones, Empieza la ciudad, Vencido el fuego de la especie, Manuscrito de la niña ausente and Neumas, among others. She frequently writes for cultural magazines such as Encuentro and her work has appeared in many anthologies. Gil studied at New York University and Fordham University and teaches at Baruch College of the City University of New York. She was co-director of the literary magazines Lyra and Románica. In 1994, she was guest editor of Brújula, the magazine of the New York Institute of Latin American Writers. As a journalist, she has worked for The Jersey Journal, Hearst International Publications and Editors Press Service. Her work has been recognized by the New Jersey State Council for the Arts, the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, among others. (Cintas for literature, 1979-80. 1991-92)

  • Tres Cosas (Three Things, Bronze on stone base, 16" x 8" x 8"

    Eladio González (b. 1937, Matanzas): The sculptor Eladio González has been exhibiting his work in the United States since his first solo show at the Chicago Press Club in 1972. He has participated in exhibitions at the Cuban Museum of Art and Culture in Miami, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Chicago Institute of Contemporary Art, among others. González graduated from the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes San Alejandro in Havana in 1962. (Cintas for art, 1979-80)

  • JULIO HERNANADEZ ROJO

    Untitled, 1988, acrylic and ink on canvas, 37” x 49”

    Julio Hernández Rojo (b. 1937, Havana -d. 1994, Miami): As an active member of the anti-Castro Directorio Revolucionario Estudiantil, Hernández Rojo participated in clandestine incursions to Cuba and eventually served more than 15 years as a political prisoner. It was in prison that Hernández Rojo began to paint. After his return to the United States, he participated in a number of exhibitions in Miami and became known for his colorful, optimistic landscapes. His work is in the permanent collection of the Miami-Dade Public Libraries. (Cintas for art, 1979-80) 

  • Silent Cry,1988, fiberglass, metal pipes, paint, 83.5 h x71.687 w x 4 d

    Ramón Lago (b. 1947, La Esperanza): In the 1960s, Lago was one of the youngest artists ever to exhibit at the National Academy of Design.  He has created several pieces of public sculpture, including Continuum at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton and Silent Cry at Florida International University. Lago studied under José de Creft and Nathaniel Katz at the Art Students League and also attended the Newark School of Fine Arts and the National Academy of Design. Lago taught at Cooper Union. He is the winner of a Roman Bronza award in sculpture. (Cintas for art, 1979-80)

  • Gustav Magrinat (b. 1947, Havana): A graduate of Harvard University with a magna cum laude in English literature, Magrinat was a translator, writer and contributing editor of the Wilson Quarterly until 1983, when he enrolled at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill to pursue a degree in medicine. He now practices medicine in Greensboro, North Carolina, and looks forward to writing again once he retires. (Cintas for literature, 1979-80)

  • Ana Maria Martínez (Cintas for art, 1979-80)

  • Pablo Medina (b. Havana): A poet, novelist and educator, Medina has collaborated with musicians to explore the ways music and poetry can enrich each other.  His poetry collections Pork Rind and Cuban Songs, Arching into the Afterlife, The Floating Island, Puntos de apoyoand The Man Who Wrote on Water. He is also the author of a memoir titled Exiled Memories: A Cuban Childhood; and the novels, The Marks of Birth, The Return of Felix Nogaraand Cubop City Blues. With Carolina Hospital, he wrote Everyone Will Have to Listen/Todos me van a tener que oir, a collection of translations from the Spanish of pieces by Cuban dissident Tania Díaz Castro. He has been the recipient of grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Program, the New Jersey and Pennsylvania State Arts Councils and the United States Information Agency. Medina received undergraduate and graduate degrees from Georgetown University. (Cintas for literature, 1979-80)

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