1989-90

  • Los Amiguitos de Gloria, 1993, Gelatin silver print on paper, 9.875” x 9.875”

    Mario Algaze (b. 1947, Havana): Traveling extensively as a freelance photographer, Algaze has devoted his career to documenting life in the cities and countryside of Latin America. His evocative photographs have been featured in solo and group exhibitions in the United States and abroad and his work has been purchased for the collections of museums such as the Tamayo, in Mexico, the Santa Barbara Museum, The Duke University Museum and the Fundación Guayasamín in Quito. He is the winner of several fellowships, including one from the National Endowment for the Arts. His work was included in the Outside Cuba exhibition and in the Cuba-USA: The First Generation traveling exhibition and is in the permanent collection of the Miami-Dade Public Library. (Cintas in art, 1989-90)

  • Luis Calzadilla (b. 1957, Cienfuegos- d. 1997, Miami): A partner in the architecture firm Thomas & Calzadilla PA Metropolitan Architects in Miami, Calzadilla worked on projects throughout Florida, including the St. Louis condominium on Brickell Key, the Cypress Park recreation building in Coral Springs, the St. Petersburg Pier renovation, and an addition to the Miami Country Day School in Miami Shores. An art collector and patron, Calzadilla was a member of the board of the Miami Art Museum. Calzadilla received his architecture degree from the Rhode Island School of Design. (Cintas for architecture, 1989-90)

  • Angel Cuadra (b. 1931, Havana): After graduating from the University of Havana, Cuadra practiced law in Cuba until he was imprisoned for his political beliefs. He moved to the United States in 1985 and obtained a Master’s degree in Hispanic studies from Florida International University. Cuadra has taught at FIU and Miami Dade College, where he ran the Spanish-language program of MDC’s Miami International Book Fair. Cuadra became the first Latin American writer to receive the Amantes del Teruel award for poetry. His poetry collections include Peldaño, Impromptus, Tiempo del hombre, Las señales y los sueños, for which he won the Teruel, and Diez sonetos ocultos. He is also the author of Escritores en Cuba socialista and José Martí: Análisis y conclusiones. (Cintas for literature, 1989-90)

  • Roberto de Alba (b. 1957, Havana): A designer and web developer, de Alba practiced architecture with I.M. Pei and Partners and taught architectural design at Yale University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He was executive editor for Architecture & Design at Thomson Reuters and at Watson-Guptill Publications before moving to the field of interactive digital media. He is founding partner of Spliteye Multimedia, a New York City web development firm that has clients in the fields of art and architecture. He is the author of Paul Rudolph: The Late Work (2003, Princeton Architectural Press, New York) and editor of Perspecta, the Yale Architectural Journal (Rizzoli, New York). De Alba has a Bachelor's in design from the University of Florida and a Master's in Architecture from Yale University. (Cintas for architecture, 1989-90)

  • Ixtlan De Los Hervores, Mexico,  1989, Ektacolor type C photograph, 21” x 25”

    Eduardo Del Valle (b. 1951, Havana): Working in collaboration with his wife, Mirta Gomez, since 1973, Del Valle’s photography often documents the life and geography of Yucatan, Mexico. He is the recipient two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships as well as fellowships from the New York State Council for the Arts, the Florida Arts Council and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, among others. His work is included in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the California Museum of Photography and the Bibliotheque Nationale de France. His work was included in the Cuba-USA: The First Generation traveling exhibition.  Del Valle and Gómez’s books include Fried Waters published by Nazraeli Press in 2005 and Between Runs, which consist of photographs made at the Hing Yip printing plant in Dongguan, China. Del Valle holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from Brooklyn College and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Florida International University. He is a professor of photography at FIU (Cintas for art, 1989-90, 1995-96)

  • Mirta Gómez (b. 1953, Havana): Working in collaboration with her husband, Eduardo del Valle, since 1973, Gómez’s photography often documents the life and geography of Yucatan, Mexico. She is the recipient two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships as well as fellowships from the New York State Council for the Arts, the Florida Arts Council and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, among others. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the California Museum of Photography and the Bibliotheque Nationale de France. Her work was included in the Cuba-USA: The First Generation traveling exhibition. Gómez and Del Valle’s books include Fried Waters, published by Nazraeli Press in 2005, and Between Runs, which consist of photographs made at the Hing Yip printing plant in Dongguan, China. Gómez holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from Brooklyn College and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Florida International University. She is a professor of photography at FIU. (Cintas for art, 1989-90, 1995-96)

  • Félix González-Torres (b. 1957, Güaimaro-d. 1996, Miami): The minimalist artist Félix González-Torres began his career in photography but expanded to create installations and conceptual work. His pieces were included the biennial exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Venice Biennial and the Sydney Biennial and in exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, among other venues. He had solo exhibitions at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Brooklyn Museum, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum in Progress in Vienna, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., and the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, as well as in museums in Germany, Switzerland and Austria. One of his pieces was selected for the exhibition Latin American & Caribbean Art presented by the Museum of Modern Art at El Museo del Barrio in New York. He received fellowships and grants from the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst program in Berlin, the Gordon Matta-Clark Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pollock-Krasner foundation and Art Matter, Inc. He studied at the Pratt Institute and at the International Center for Photography in New York. An extended interview with González Torres appeared in the 1996 book Between Artists. (Cintas for art, 1989-90)

  • María Elena González (b. 1957, Havana): Using industrial materials such as tile, safety surface rubber and glass, González creates installations that draw community participation. In 2002, she spent two weeks in Memphis working with the city’s Hispanic community with a grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation. In 2003, the National Endowment for the Arts sponsored an art project involving residents of a public housing complex in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. She lectures frequently, and has had solo shows at venues such The Nuyorican Poets Café and El Museo del Barrio in New York, and the Ludwig Foundation of Cuba. Group shows include the VII Bienal Iberoamericana de Arte Domecq in Mexico City, the Biennial of Contemporary Latin American Artist in Connecticut, Cadences: Icon and Abstraction in Context at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, and the Encuentro interamericano de artistas plásticos in Guadalajara. She has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in sculpture from Florida International University and a Master of Fine arts degree in sculpture from San Francisco State University. (Cintas for art, 1989-90, 1994-95)

  • Casita en Miami, oil on canvas, 26” x 38”

    Emilio Sánchez (b. 1921, Camagüey- d. 1999, Warwick, N.Y): After moving to New York City in 1944 to study painting and printmaking at the Art Students League, Sánchez embarked in a successful artistic career. Among the group shows in which he participated are Artistas Latinoamericanos, at the Museo Español de Arte Contemporáneo in Madrid, Outside Cuba, El Espíritu Latinoamericano: Arte y Artistas en los Estados Unidos, Latin American Artists in the U.S. before 1950 at the GodwinTernbach Museum in Flushing; and Breaking Barriers: Selections from the Museum of Arts Permanent Contemporary Cuban Collection at the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale. Although Sánchez is perhaps best known for his paintings of houses and other architectural themes, his body of work also included still lifes, flowers, landscapes, portraits and human figures. Sanchez’s work is in the permanent collections of many institutions, including the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Museo de Arte Moderno of Bogota, the Miami-Dade Public Library and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. (Cintas for art, 1989-90)

  • Ejacute in Trajectory, 1990, Cibachrome print, 24 ½” x 32 ½” (each)

    Andrés Serrano (b. 1950, New York): After exploding upon the U.S. art scene with his controversial photo of a crucifix immersed in urine, Serrano has never stayed far from America’s off-and-on culture wars. Topics for his photographic series have ranged from mutilated bodies in a morgue, Ku Klux Klan members and explicit sex scenes, to portraits of everyday Americans. “I want to explore the unexplorable," Serrano once said.  For his work, he has won awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation and the New York State Council on the Arts, and has been featured in countless solo and group shows in the United States and abroad. In 2013, Serrano created Sign of the Times” a project for which he collected 200 signs from homeless people in New York City. He described the work as “a testimony to the homeless men and women who roam the streets in search of food and shelter.” (Cintas in art, 1989-90)

  • Alberto Torre de Alba (b. 1954, Havana): A sculptor and expressionist painter, Torre de Alba received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Philadelphia College of Art. He has shown his work in galleries in Florida, New Jersey and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and participated in the exhibitions The New/Lo Nuevo at the Cuban Museum of Art and Culture and The Post Miami Generation, at the InterAmerican Art Gallery. His work is in the permanent collection of the Miami-Dade Public Library. (Cintas for art, 1989-90)

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